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Sources & Notes

Source: Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic (ASEC) Supplement, 1962, 1970, 1980, 1990, 2000, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017

Notes: Years 1962, 1970, 1980 and 1990 were extracted using CPS Utilities from Unicon Research

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